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“you” phrasing

Don’t Turn Your Selling Message into a “Selfie”

Oxford Dictionaries recently named its 2013 Word of the Year:  selfie

(For the unaware, a selfie is when someone takes a picture of themselves and posts it on social media.)

The word is incredibly popular both in lexicon and application. According to the BBC, use of the word “selfie” increased an astounding 17,000% during 2013. And, according to world leaders, it’s now OK to take a selfie at memorial services.selfie

Just because it’s popular doesn’t make it right. In fact, a Birmingham Business School discussion paper recently reported that people who post more selfies have shallow relationships with people. And that “increased frequency of sharing photographs of the self, regardless of the type of target sharing the photographs, is related to a decrease in intimacy.”

Unfortunately, many marketing and sales organizations create and deliver what can only be called “selfie” messaging and presentations, focused more on your own company, products, services, and benefits, and less on talking about your prospects problems, risks and resulting needs.

You are rightfully proud of your stuff, and you want everyone to know and care about it as much as you do. But, you must resist the temptation to turn your campaigns and content into a selfie.

Want to kick the selfie habit? Read this article I wrote for MarketingProfs: “Nine Common Phrases Made Great by Using ‘You’ Instead of ‘We’”

 

The perfect salesperson

Dabney_Steele

He’s sharp, insightful, executes flawless selling techniques, speaks at just the right moment, and the things he says move mountains. Prospects swoon and open their wallets every time he walks into the room.

Who is this guy?  None other than Dabney Steele, conversation expert.

In this week’s episode, Dabney Steele introduces us to the concept of “you phrasing.” He reminds us not to we, we, we all over our prospects.

See Dabney Steele in action.

 

 

 

Nine common phrases made great by using "you" instead of "we"

by Tim Riesterer

When the littlest piggy cries, “Wee, wee, wee” all the way home, that isn’t a good thing. And neither is saying “we, we, we” all over your website, campaigns, and marketing and sales messages.

If you could do only one thing this year that could make an instant difference in your messaging, you’d replace all your “we phrasing” with “you phrasing.”  You phrasing is more effective because it makes sure your prospect or customer is at the center of your story and engaged in the conversation.

Why Use ‘You’ Instead of ‘We’?

Using the word “you” instead of “we” helps transfer ownership to your prospects and customers because it causes their minds to unconsciously “try out” your solutions as you describe what they can do with it. Your audience member is no longer just a passive listener; he will be more actively engaged in your ideas and your story. In fact, you probably noticed I’m already using the technique in this blog post to gain your attention and give you ownership over implementing this strategy!

Still skeptical?

You phrasing has been proven to have a measurable impact. Researchers in Tempe, Arizona tested attitudes toward cable television. They used two different scripts to sell the cable services—one using the third person and one using you phrasing. Researchers found that when you phrasing was implemented, it doubled the number of cable sales. Now, that’s impressive!

Start Changing Phrases Today

Once you start practicing with you phrasing, you’ll find yourself in your customers’ and prospects’ worlds more than you have ever been. That will help you connect your story to your customers’ stories in a powerful way—one that they’ll want to listen to because you’re addressing their needs and concerns, and not your company’s.

Here’s a list of common phrases that can become more effective by using you phrasing:

  • “Our company allows you to… ”
  • “Next, I’m going to… ”
  • “We need to be able to… ”
  • “What if I could show you… ”

Now, see if you notice a difference in these phrases…

  • “What you’ll be able to do is… ”
  • “Next, you’ll be able to… ”
  • “You need to be able to… ”
  • “What if you could… ”
  • “What you can do is… “

The difference is subtle but powerful. By using you phrasing, you are helping your prospects’ and customers’ unconscious minds feel like they’re participating. In fact, you phrasing isn’t just a technique;  it should be your mindset. You phrasing forces you to live in your prospects’ and customers’ worlds, the places they need you to care about and understand if you want to close more deals with them.

Using “you” instead of “we” is a simple and quick change, but one that will have notable results if you apply it correctly. So, next time you’re creating a marketing campaign or other marketing communications content, use the word “you” to capture the attention of your audience. By doing so, you’ll make them want to consider making a change and to pick you.

 

“This article originally appeared on MarketingProfs.”

 

Nine common phrases made great by using “you” instead of “we”

by Tim Riesterer

When the littlest piggy cries, “Wee, wee, wee” all the way home, that isn’t a good thing. And neither is saying “we, we, we” all over your website, campaigns, and marketing and sales messages.

If you could do only one thing this year that could make an instant difference in your messaging, you’d replace all your “we phrasing” with “you phrasing.”  You phrasing is more effective because it makes sure your prospect or customer is at the center of your story and engaged in the conversation.

Why Use ‘You’ Instead of ‘We’?

Using the word “you” instead of “we” helps transfer ownership to your prospects and customers because it causes their minds to unconsciously “try out” your solutions as you describe what they can do with it. Your audience member is no longer just a passive listener; he will be more actively engaged in your ideas and your story. In fact, you probably noticed I’m already using the technique in this blog post to gain your attention and give you ownership over implementing this strategy!

Still skeptical?

You phrasing has been proven to have a measurable impact. Researchers in Tempe, Arizona tested attitudes toward cable television. They used two different scripts to sell the cable services—one using the third person and one using you phrasing. Researchers found that when you phrasing was implemented, it doubled the number of cable sales. Now, that’s impressive!

Start Changing Phrases Today

Once you start practicing with you phrasing, you’ll find yourself in your customers’ and prospects’ worlds more than you have ever been. That will help you connect your story to your customers’ stories in a powerful way—one that they’ll want to listen to because you’re addressing their needs and concerns, and not your company’s.

Here’s a list of common phrases that can become more effective by using you phrasing:

  • “Our company allows you to… ”
  • “Next, I’m going to… ”
  • “We need to be able to… ”
  • “What if I could show you… ”

Now, see if you notice a difference in these phrases…

  • “What you’ll be able to do is… ”
  • “Next, you’ll be able to… ”
  • “You need to be able to… ”
  • “What if you could… ”
  • “What you can do is… “

The difference is subtle but powerful. By using you phrasing, you are helping your prospects’ and customers’ unconscious minds feel like they’re participating. In fact, you phrasing isn’t just a technique;  it should be your mindset. You phrasing forces you to live in your prospects’ and customers’ worlds, the places they need you to care about and understand if you want to close more deals with them.

Using “you” instead of “we” is a simple and quick change, but one that will have notable results if you apply it correctly. So, next time you’re creating a marketing campaign or other marketing communications content, use the word “you” to capture the attention of your audience. By doing so, you’ll make them want to consider making a change and to pick you.

 

“This article originally appeared on MarketingProfs.”

 

Are you a sinner?

You’re meeting a prospect and your PowerPoint presentation is ready to rock – it’s packed with slides  detailing your product’s many features and benefits, your company’s illustrious history and the obligatory customer logo slide.

You may think you’re prepared for your meeting, but, in reality, you are about to commit one of the deadly sins of messaging – focusing on your company rather than your prospect’s point of view.  Prospects want to hear about themselves – their industry, their pain points, their risks and possible rewards.

For more tips on how to avoid committing this sales messaging deadly sin (and others), read the full article, penned by Tim Riesterer, on MarketingProfs.